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East Tempar

East Tempar and West Tempar were settlements through which the road to the Isles ran. The track can still be seen.

Schiehallion from the East Tempar Track - in Feb 2009

Schiehallion from the East Tempar Track - Feb 2009

Alder at East Tempar Burn

Ash at the East Tempar Burn

Dyke at East Tempar

Dyke at East Tempar

Dyke at East Tempar

Dyke at East Tempar

Dyke at East Tempar

Dyke at East Tempar

Dyke at East Tempar

Dyke at East Tempar - note the A shape in the collapsed section.

Diseased Elm at East Tempar - probably killed by dutch elm disease. It is now being attacked by bracket fungi.

Granodioirite erratic at East Tempar. It was carried here by the eastward flowing ice that came from Rannoch Moor.

Lime Kiln at East Tempar. The tree growing out of it is a bird cherry. At one time limestone was quarried in the vicinity and processed in the kiln to produce fertiliser.

A depression where limestone was quarried for the kiln.

Schiehallion from the road near East Tempar

A well formed beech at East Tempar. Beech is not a native tree but adds to the landscape.

The first gateway on the East Tempar Track.

The Schiehallion Boulder BedThe pink granite pebbles can be seen in the photograph. It is thought that they were carried by floating ice from a mass of granite which existed in the region of Greenland about 600 million years ago.

The Schiehallion Boulder Bed at East Tempar

The stump of a beech that was felled because the wind was blowing it over. It turned out to be hollow.

Rannoch Net

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